Stories From the Field: PMC riders recap PMC weekend

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Pan-Mass Challenge

Stories From the Field: PMC riders recap PMC weekend

Now that we've all had a chance to rehydrate, sleep and recover from the 30th annual Pan-Massachusetts Challenge, dozens of local riders are sharing their favorite memories and personal stories. Here are a few. The Amesbury News recaps first time PMCer Kristin Beauparlant's ride. Beauparlant, a nurse, rode the PMC in honor of her late patient, PMCer Beth Bennett. NECN featured Beauparlant in the opening ceremony, where she was on stage with Bennett's bike – which she also rode in the two day ride. Here's what she told the Amesbury News: "This [past] weekend was one of the most amazing and inspiring moments in my life," Beauparlant said. "What a great event. When the (NECN) piece was done, I looked out in the audience of thousands and to have them all-standing and clapping was absolutely amazing. It just brought tears to my eyes that this story of mine was able to inspire others." Newton Tab editor Gail Spector also shared her PMC experience, writing a first person essay. After writing about the stress of training and fundraising, Spector made a quick realization on PMC weekend: She writes: "And once again, like the years preceding this one, I was caught up in what turned out to be an amazing day. Probably the most productive day of my year. So what if training is a little inconvenient? Is it really that big a deal if fundraising is hard? Does any of this compare with the pain my father suffered? Or what my mom went through while taking care of him? So what if it's hard? "I rode my bike 84 miles to be part of something great that has raised at least $250 million by now for cancer research. What else do I have to do?" Chris and Stephanie George of Danvers shared their first PMC experience with the Danvers Herald. Chris writes: "To see crowds of people lining the streets with dedications to loved ones who passed away, as well as living cancer survivors was truly a humbling experience. Stephanie and I rode in memory of her dad and my grandmother, both of whom passed away from cancer. In the end, we realized that the PMC is not about the personal achievement — it's about what the thousands of riders and volunteers, who are strong and able, are able to give to others: life, hope and a chance of curing this dreaded disease." Boxford and Topsfield PMCers share their story here Among them was second-year rider Laurie Rundlett, who says: "My second year riding in the PMC was a whole different experience than my first. I was much more prepared for it this time around. I trained hard, knew when and what to eat and drink and how much, and pushed myself harder than I thought I could…I wore a photo of my Mom on my back and so many people made comments on it. Climbing the big hills, just when you think you can't go any further, someone comes along and tells you "great job" or "keep pushing!"… When all is said and done, I will have raised over $8,000 for the Jimmy Fund in 2007 and 2009 combined. My job isn't done though. I'm already planning for 2010, and have started recruiting new riders to join me next year in the fight against cancer." PMC veteran Brenda White keeps her fundraising efforts going all summer long at Revere Beach, according this story in the Lynn Daily Item. And read al about some great volunteers from Sharon in the Sharon Advocate. Many more riders share their persona accomplishments, triumphs and experiences from PMC weekend. Read about riders from SaugusBeverly, Melrose  , Norwell , Medford , Sudbury  , Hamilton and Wenham, and Rockport . Even though PMC weekend is over, the fundraising continues. Visit pmc.org to make a donation and help the PMC meet its $30 million goal.